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2019 Israel 1 oz Silver Gates of Jerusalem Proof (New Gate)

$131.16
SKU 17153
The walls around the old city of Jerusalem were built in the 16th century by the sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. Eight gates were constructed within the walls. Seven of the gates are open and serve as passageways to the Old City.

The eight gate, known as the Golden Gate or Mercy gate, remains closed. It is said that the gate will be opened miraculously when the Messiah comes and the dead are resurrected.

Round Highlights:
  • Limited mintage of 1,800.
  • Contains 1 oz of .999 fine Silver.
  • Fourth issue of the "Gates of Jerusalem" series.
  • Medal is encapsulated and delivered in the official box of issue.
  • Obverse: Front view of the New Gate. Inscription in English and Hebrew, date, purity and weight below.
  • Reverse: Stylized sketch of the Gates of the Old City in the Walls of Jerusalem, border inscription in English and Hebrew "Gates of Jerusalem", Holy Land Mint logo below.
  • Guaranteed by the Holy Land Mint of Israel.
Add this beautifully designed 1 oz Silver round to your cart today! 

The Gates of Jerusalem have become an icon of the holy city and an attraction for tourists from all over Israel and the world. Start your journey through the city's history with the Jaffa Gate, the inaugural release of the Gates of Jerusalem series.

The New Gate in the Jerusalem Old City Wall was built in 1889 by the Ottoman authorities and is the youngest gate of the 8 main gates. 

The New Gate rendered the passage between the Old City of Jerusalem and the Christian institutions across the street. While the other gates within the walls of the Old City are more impressive in appearance with more decorative elements, the New Gate is plainer and consists of a single opening in the wall. 

The other gates were fortified in the 16th century when defensive needs were greater. Security conditions had improved by the late 19th century and the Greek Orthodox Church undertook the construction of the shops, storerooms, stables and residential apartments along the street leading to the gate. Thus the area close to the gate became a lively traffic and trading area.

The New Gate was blocked from 1948, when it was closed by the Jordanians, until 1967, when it was reopened by the Israel Defense Forces after the Six-Day War.